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Mentor Blog

Welcome to our mentor blog. Here you will find posts from
industry professionals on such topics as:
  • Resume & Cover Letter tips
  • Interview Tips
  • How to succeed at work
  • How to get a Mentor
  • What every Mentee should know
  • I lost my job. Now what?
  • Healthy habits
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  • 22 Oct 2020 7:58 PM | Mariana Fradman (Administrator)

    I once had a boss who called me into his office. He wasn’t upset; he was jealous. One of our competitors had a full page article in the local paper. He asked, “Why aren’t we getting that type of coverage?”

    I smiled. I picked up the paper. I walked around his desk. I opened it and said, “Because we are getting this type of coverage…here…and here…and here…and here!”

    While our competitor got one page, we had four photos, with stories (captions), on four different pages. In fact, we were averaging 12 media citations a month in the local press, not including television coverage.

    The next day, the chairman of the Board was visiting. He called me into the president’s office. The president had just showed him the previous day’s paper. He asked me, “How do you do this?”

    Well, the chairman and I got along very well. I said, “In addition to my many positive qualities…” (He interrupted to invoke the Deity.) “…charm, chiseled features, rugged good looks, superior intellect, superlative education, modesty and humility…” (I paused while they discussed the termination of my services…) “I know my audience.”

    I then continued in a more serious vein…

    “Our competitor wants to please his Board members and wants to attract clients. So he no doubt badgers his contacts at the paper and finally gets them to send a reporter to write a story and take a photo. Who knows if the story is accurate? On the other hand, while I also want to please our Board members and attract clients, my primary audience, the person I care most about, are the editors of the various papers. If I give them what they need, “fillers,” they’ll publish my photos with the captions. I know the stories (captions) are accurate and that people are actually more likely to read captions than long articles. So I focus on the editors. I give them what they want. And we get what we want.”

    And, no, I was not fired!

    So what is the mistake that job seekers make? They focus on the wrong person. It’s human nature but it’s still a mistake. In other words, instead of focusing on the editors, they focus on the chairman of the Board and clients. They should be focused on the employer not themselves.

    First, candidates apply for jobs they want, not jobs for which they are wanted. There’s a huge difference. You see your dream job. You know you can do it. You really, really, really want it! And you apply. And you don’t even get an automated response for their computer system rejecting you. Why? Because they don’t want you. And if you had read the qualifications listed on the job description, through the employer’s eyes and not yours, you would have known you were not going to be considered because they don’t want you. And if they don’t want you, you are wasting your time.

    Now, that said, there is nothing wrong with introducing yourself to an employer. Maybe that are thinking about hiring someone for a position that is not yet advertised. And maybe you get lucky. So by all means, send your resume to employers who are hiring, just don’t apply for jobs for which you are unqualified. HR people don’t like that. Some even ask the questions, “Can’t this person read?” “Don’t they know what ‘Required’ means?”

    So Rule Number One is, Only apply for jobs for which you are qualified. You will save a lot of frustration.

    Now, to continue with our all too real hypothetical scenario, a candidate finds a job for which they are qualified. Now that have to open their tool box. Just as a carpenter, plumber, or electrician needs the right tool for the right job, so does the job seeker.

    The first tool in the job seeker’s tool box is the cover letter. The beauty of the cover letter is that, sadly, today, no one knows how to write. So if you write a well-written cover letter, that is short, sweet and to the point, you have already differentiated yourself from your competition in the best possible way.

    Now your cover letter needs to answer two questions: What do you want and why should they (the employer) want you? So you clearly state the job for which you are applying and then, in the second paragraph, in one or two sentences, you tell the employer what you have done for your current or previous employer that shows that you can not only fulfill the responsibilities of the job but exceed them. In other words, you don’t tell them why you want the job, you tell them why they should want you. That’s Rule Number Two.

    Then you go back to your tool box and remove the other tool you have: Your resume. Rule Number Three is that the resume has to be focused on the employer and not on the candidate. No employer cares what you think about yourself. So a “Personal Statement” or “Personal Philosophy” is simply silly and a waste of valuable real estate. And having an “Objective” is just plain stupid. Your objective should be to get the job for which you are applying. If it is something else, you should not be applying for the job.

    So how do you focus your resume on the employer and not on yourself. It’s really quite simple:

    Begin with a section titled “Selected Accomplishments.” These are bullet points that, like the second paragraph of the cover letter, tell the employer why they should hire you. It makes you a “safe” hire because they know, or at least they figure, if you did this for others you can do it for them. But it also makes them think: Do we want him/her working for the competition or us?

    Also, a good interviewer asks, “Tell me about a failure you had?” It’s a great question. So answer it on the resume. Following “Selected Accomplishments” have a second titled, “Selected Failure.” That’s “failure” singular not plural. Again, as a bullet point, briefly state what the failure was. Then write, in bold What I learned: And then, no surprise, tell them what you learned. This shows that you are self-aware and learn from your failures. Everyone has failed at something. The only time you should be ashamed is if you repeat your failures.

    And then there is a third section, “What I want to learn.” This will tell the employer something about you as a professional. It reinforces the fact that you are self-aware and indicates where you want to go with your career. So, for example, if you are in IT, you might include getting certifications. If you are a fundraiser you might want to mention learning planned giving. If you are a teacher, you could mention educational administration. Now with COVID the question will come up, if you have been unemployed for the past three-four months, how have you been spending your time? What have you been doing to achieve these educational goals? If you have not been doing anything to improve professionally, well you have made a very big mistake. I strongly advice that you start correcting it NOW.

    So when looking for a job, and applying for a job, keep focused on the employer. Before they will meet your needs, you have to meet theirs. That’s life. That is how the game is played.

    Oh, and it’s the same for the interviews. As far as I am concerned, the questions you ask are far more important than the answers you give. But this article is long enough and that’s a topic for another day.

    https://hsstaffing.wordpress.com/2020/07/23/the-biggest-mistake-job-seekers-make/

  • 22 Oct 2020 7:42 PM | Mariana Fradman (Administrator)

    Bruce Hurwitz 12:07 pm on July 23, 2020  

    The Biggest Mistake Job Seekers Make

    I once had a boss who called me into his office. He wasn’t upset; he was jealous. One of our competitors had a full page article in the local paper. He asked, “Why aren’t we getting that type of coverage?”

    I smiled. I picked up the paper. I walked around his desk. I opened it and said, “Because we are getting this type of coverage…here…and here…and here…and here!”

    While our competitor got one page, we had four photos, with stories (captions), on four different pages. In fact, we were averaging 12 media citations a month in the local press, not including television coverage.

    The next day, the chairman of the Board was visiting. He called me into the president’s office. The president had just showed him the previous day’s paper. He asked me, “How do you do this?”

    Well, the chairman and I got along very well. I said, “In addition to my many positive qualities…” (He interrupted to invoke the Deity.) “…charm, chiseled features, rugged good looks, superior intellect, superlative education, modesty and humility…” (I paused while they discussed the termination of my services…) “I know my audience.”

    I then continued in a more serious vein…

    “Our competitor wants to please his Board members and wants to attract clients. So he no doubt badgers his contacts at the paper and finally gets them to send a reporter to write a story and take a photo. Who knows if the story is accurate? On the other hand, while I also want to please our Board members and attract clients, my primary audience, the person I care most about, are the editors of the various papers. If I give them what they need, “fillers,” they’ll publish my photos with the captions. I know the stories (captions) are accurate and that people are actually more likely to read captions than long articles. So I focus on the editors. I give them what they want. And we get what we want.”

    And, no, I was not fired!

    So what is the mistake that job seekers make? They focus on the wrong person. It’s human nature but it’s still a mistake. In other words, instead of focusing on the editors, they focus on the chairman of the Board and clients. They should be focused on the employer not themselves.

    First, candidates apply for jobs they want, not jobs for which they are wanted. There’s a huge difference. You see your dream job. You know you can do it. You really, really, really want it! And you apply. And you don’t even get an automated response for their computer system rejecting you. Why? Because they don’t want you. And if you had read the qualifications listed on the job description, through the employer’s eyes and not yours, you would have known you were not going to be considered because they don’t want you. And if they don’t want you, you are wasting your time.

    Now, that said, there is nothing wrong with introducing yourself to an employer. Maybe that are thinking about hiring someone for a position that is not yet advertised. And maybe you get lucky. So by all means, send your resume to employers who are hiring, just don’t apply for jobs for which you are unqualified. HR people don’t like that. Some even ask the questions, “Can’t this person read?” “Don’t they know what ‘Required’ means?”

    So Rule Number One is, Only apply for jobs for which you are qualified. You will save a lot of frustration.

    Now, to continue with our all too real hypothetical scenario, a candidate finds a job for which they are qualified. Now that have to open their tool box. Just as a carpenter, plumber, or electrician needs the right tool for the right job, so does the job seeker.

    The first tool in the job seeker’s tool box is the cover letter. The beauty of the cover letter is that, sadly, today, no one knows how to write. So if you write a well-written cover letter, that is short, sweet and to the point, you have already differentiated yourself from your competition in the best possible way.

    Now your cover letter needs to answer two questions: What do you want and why should they (the employer) want you? So you clearly state the job for which you are applying and then, in the second paragraph, in one or two sentences, you tell the employer what you have done for your current or previous employer that shows that you can not only fulfill the responsibilities of the job but exceed them. In other words, you don’t tell them why you want the job, you tell them why they should want you. That’s Rule Number Two.

    Then you go back to your tool box and remove the other tool you have: Your resume. Rule Number Three is that the resume has to be focused on the employer and not on the candidate. No employer cares what you think about yourself. So a “Personal Statement” or “Personal Philosophy” is simply silly and a waste of valuable real estate. And having an “Objective” is just plain stupid. Your objective should be to get the job for which you are applying. If it is something else, you should not be applying for the job.

    So how do you focus your resume on the employer and not on yourself. It’s really quite simple:

    Begin with a section titled “Selected Accomplishments.” These are bullet points that, like the second paragraph of the cover letter, tell the employer why they should hire you. It makes you a “safe” hire because they know, or at least they figure, if you did this for others you can do it for them. But it also makes them think: Do we want him/her working for the competition or us?

    Also, a good interviewer asks, “Tell me about a failure you had?” It’s a great question. So answer it on the resume. Following “Selected Accomplishments” have a second titled, “Selected Failure.” That’s “failure” singular not plural. Again, as a bullet point, briefly state what the failure was. Then write, in bold What I learned: And then, no surprise, tell them what you learned. This shows that you are self-aware and learn from your failures. Everyone has failed at something. The only time you should be ashamed is if you repeat your failures.

    And then there is a third section, “What I want to learn.” This will tell the employer something about you as a professional. It reinforces the fact that you are self-aware and indicates where you want to go with your career. So, for example, if you are in IT, you might include getting certifications. If you are a fundraiser you might want to mention learning planned giving. If you are a teacher, you could mention educational administration. Now with COVID the question will come up, if you have been unemployed for the past three-four months, how have you been spending your time? What have you been doing to achieve these educational goals? If you have not been doing anything to improve professionally, well you have made a very big mistake. I strongly advice that you start correcting it NOW.

    So when looking for a job, and applying for a job, keep focused on the employer. Before they will meet your needs, you have to meet theirs. That’s life. That is how the game is played.

    Oh, and it’s the same for the interviews. As far as I am concerned, the questions you ask are far more important than the answers you give. But this article is long enough and that’s a topic for another day.

    https://hsstaffing.wordpress.com/2020/07/23/the-biggest-mistake-job-seekers-make/


  • 10 Sep 2020 9:32 PM | Mariana Fradman (Administrator)

    By: Lauren Frazer

    Lauren Frazer is a senior editor for Indeed’s Career Guide with over 15 years of experience in content creation, editorial and marketing. Based in New Hampshire, she thrives upon helping job seekers learn what they need to develop and grow.

    In the wake of COVID-19, the job market can feel difficult to navigate—especially if you have employment barriers, like gaps in your employment history. While the global pandemic has made in-person communication difficult, it doesn’t mean finding a job needs to be. In this article, we’ll offer tips for reaching and impressing employers virtually if you’ve typically had success getting jobs by connecting face-to-face.

    How to stand out in a virtual job market

    Here are a few simple ways you can stand out to employers during COVID-19 when you can't connect directly in person:

    1. Make yourself available.

    Due to the fluctuations in the economy, certain employers need to hire immediately. Being able to start working as soon as possible can make you a more desirable job candidate to employers and recruiters than someone who can’t. To find jobs available now, start with our guides:

    Tara Thompson McCracken, Director of the Western District of the Workforce Development Center for Goodwill Industries of Northwest North Carolina, says, "The majority of job seekers we are working with—who often have various barriers to employment—are really ready now. They are applying now and ready to work now which meets a lot of employers’ immediate needs. Many employers are in immediate need to hire at the local—as opposed to remote—level and this can change from day to day which makes it a really great time for individuals with barriers to find employment.”

    McCracken recommends making yourself more available to work on short notice: “Make sure that you are expressing your open availability on the online application so that employers notice this right away.” You can communicate this both in your application, if applicable, as well as your cover letter.

    You can also indicate your readiness to work by toggling on the “Ready to work” option in the “About me” section of your Indeed profile. Doing so alerts employers that you can start work immediately.


    Related: How to Write a Cover Letter

    2. Review and tailor your resume.

    If you have potential employment barriers, ensuring your resume is as up-to-date, communicative, polished and customized to the job you want is crucial. McCracken says, “To get noticed virtually, make sure all of the documents that you put out there for employers are up-to-date, accurate and look top notch. This includes the basics like resume and online applications.”

    To do so, make sure your resume is:

    Up-to-date. An updated resume and cover letter highlight your most recent and relevant skills, accomplishments and experience. Make sure you’ve included all of the credentials that make you a great fit specifically for the job you’re applying for. These might include:

    • Paid or unpaid jobs
    • Extracurricular activities
    • Certifications
    • Awards
    • Specialized training
    • Courses
    • Internships
    • Volunteer work

    Include only the most recent 10-15 years of professional experience to make your resume relevant and readable. If you have more than five years of professional experience, consider removing the dates from your education section and relocate it towards the bottom of your resume. .

    To see examples of resumes and cover letters in your field, browse our free Resume Samples and Cover Letter Samples. You can also create an Indeed Resume to easily apply to jobs online with professional resume templates made specifically to suit employer preferences.

    Related: Guide to Updating Your Resume

    Polished and professional. It is critical to proofread and review your resume to ensure it is error-free with correct grammar, punctuation and spelling and formatting. Consider asking a trusted friend, family member or colleague to review your resume—they will likely find things you missed on your own.

    Customized. McCracken points out that “Although simple, many job seekers still don’t consider adjusting their resume and applications to meet the position’s needs.” Tailoring your resume shows the employer that you are interested in working for their company in particular and why you are the best fit. Most of the time, this information is not obvious from a generic template cover letter and resume:Resumes and cover letters are even more important in this virtual environment since that is the first impression.”

    Tailor your resume by carefully rereading the job posting. Include keywords in the skills, requirements, and job description sections that match your background.

    Related: How to Write a Resume Employers Will Notice

    3. Seek out and attend virtual hiring events.

    If you’re accustomed to seeking out managers and employers in person to prove yourself, there are alternatives to connect with employers virtually. McCracken explains: “I’ve seen an increase in virtual hiring events from various employers and on a larger scale, like virtual career expos. Staying up-to-date on these opportunities is a great way to get noticed.”

    One great example is Indeed’s Virtual Hiring Tour, which allows you to connect and interview with employers from the safety of your home. McCracken recommends searching for these events in the following online locations:

    • Local job sites
    • Facebook pages (events, groups and companies)
    • Employer-specific websites
    • Local chamber of commerce websites
    • Local job search resource websites

    If you don’t have a computer…
    McCracken adds, “If you do not have access to a computer at home, consider using a smartphone or seeking out the local library, local Goodwill career center or other job search resources that may be open for in-person assistance.”

    Another option is to attend drive-thru hiring events in your area. Doing so is a safe way to meet with and prove yourself to employers without needing a computer or internet.

    Most importantly, McCracken encourages job seekers not to feel intimidated by virtual experiences over in-person meetings: “Don’t be afraid to hop on a virtual hiring event! Employers are adjusting to the virtual world just as much as job seekers in some cases and hiring managers are being flexible!”

    Strengthening your network virtually

    SilkRoad’s applicant tracking data revealed that referrals accounted for 30% of all hires overall in 2016 and 45% of internal hires. In a highly-virtual world where you can’t as easily connect with people in person, it’s all the more important to know how to strengthen your network remotely.

    To do so, McCracken recommends both engaging in virtual networking to make new connections, and tapping into your existing network through friends, family and former colleagues: “Employers like to interview and hire people who they know or people who come with a recommendation.”

    Let people in your life know you’re looking for work and interested in learning about new opportunities they may come across. Using your networks is a great way to get noticed and possibly move your online application to the top of the stack.

    Related: The Complete Guide to Networking

    4. Show your personality and soft skills virtually.

    One of the most effective ways to win a hiring employer over is by demonstrating your personality and soft skills in-person. You can also communicate these attributes virtually. Here’s how to demonstrate the following qualities:

    Detail-oriented. Ensure your resume and cover letter are free of typos, formatted correctly and easy to read. Submitting application materials that are polished and error-free also shows employers that you value professionalism.

    Related: 27 Proofreading Tips That Will Improve Your Resume

    Reliable. Show that you’re a reliable employee by being on time—if not early—to your virtual hiring event interview. Following up and providing the recruiter or hiring manager with your application materials promptly also shows you’re reliable and responsible.

    Tenacious. Demonstrate your work ethic and determination by taking an Indeed Assessment. Going above and beyond what the employer may be expecting of you shows tenacity, a quality any employer would like to see in a potential employee.

    Enthusiastic. Employers want employees to be excited about their work. Convey your level of enthusiasm for the position by being engaged and alert during your phone and video interviews. Be on time, focus on your interviewer, make eye contact and ask questions to show that you are thoroughly involved in the conversation.

    Friendly. While you won’t necessarily be able to connect in the same way you would in-person, showing your personality can also easily be done virtually. Sit up straight, smile and speak clearly and confidently—you have valuable experience and qualities to offer the employer, so enter any hiring conversations with that in mind. Show the employer who you are by being genuinely interested in your interviewer, asking thoughtful questions and displaying gratitude for their consideration.

    Published on Indeed September 8, 2020

  • 09 Sep 2020 10:17 PM | Harvey Simon

    In looking for an Entry Level Paralegal Position in Civil Law, NYC Legal Aid Society has open positions in Tenant Advocacy. My prior NYC Gov't experience in the SCRIE Program and familiarity with DHCR, I believe, would make me a very valuable Teammember, even though my Paralegal experience in this context is entry level. How may I be succinct and effective in my cover letter, in this regard?

    Thanks for your time,

    Harvey L. Simon, (Paralegal and MPA)       

  • 27 Aug 2020 8:29 PM | Samantha Vitone (Administrator)

    By: Signe Whitson 

    The professional atmosphere of a typical workplace setting inhibits the direct and honest expression of emotions such as anger and frustration. Yet, even in the most business-like environments, employees experience these strong emotions over daily events. Couple professional pressure to mask emotions with the tone-obfuscating medium of email, and you have yourself a recipe for passive-aggressive behavior

     — the perfect office crime.


    In a recent survey, Adobe discovered the nine most-hated passive-aggressive email phrases used in the workplace. Below, I offer three steps that workers can take to avoid becoming entangled in no-win, passive-aggressive conflicts at work, along with suggestions for effective responses that de-escalate the bubbling hostility of a passive-aggressive office situation.

    Step 1: Know what you are dealing with.

    The first skill to effectively managing passive-aggressive email communication is to see beyond the sugarcoated phrasing and recognize the hostility that lies beneath. When you see the kind of  patterned wording cited in the Adobe study (e.g., “As previously stated” or “Please advise”), a red flag should be raised in your mind, and you should ask yourself if the sender of the message may be harboring some hidden anger toward you.

    Step 2: Refuse to engage.

    Once you learn to readily recognize the red flags of passive-aggressive communication, the next essential step is to resist the urge to mirror the sender’s hostility. The goal of the passive-aggressive person is to get someone else to visibly act out the anger that they have been concealing. Any time their covertly hostile email is responded to with overt hostility, the passive-aggressive person succeeds. Rather than mirroring passive-aggressive behavior and increasing the overall hostility quotient in the workplace, savvy professionals know to defuse the hostility instead with emotionally neutral, bland responses. For example:

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “Not sure if you saw my last email...”

    Don’t mirror the hostility by replying: “Not sure if you realize how busy I am…”

    But rather drain off some of the hostility by starting with, “Thanks for the reminder.”

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “Re-attaching for your convenience...”

    Don’t up the ante by replying: “I got the attachment the first time you sent it and don’t need you to clog up my inbox with your repeated reminders.”

    But rather model respectful communication by saying, “I appreciate that you re-sent the document.”

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “As previously stated...”

    Don’t jeopardize your own professionalism by replying with the first sarcastic thought that pops into your mind, such as, “Oh, did you state that previously? I must have missed it, because you talk so much that I usually just tune you out.”

    Rather, keep it classy and don’t take the bait. A simple, “Thanks for the recap” will go a long way in keeping a friendly workplace and rising above someone else’s covert anger.

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “Any updates on this?”

    Don’t engage in passive-aggressive behavior of your own by intentionally ignoring or delaying your response to their request for updates.

    But rather, offer a polite, factual response such as, “I don’t have any updates yet,” or even better, “I don’t have any updates at this time, but I will email you as soon as I do.”

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “Sorry for the double email.”

    Don’t respond with angry or aggressive language that will make you look like the office hothead (and help the passive-aggressive person look like your victim), such as, “That’s actually the third time this week you’ve bothered me with this, and if you email again, I’m going to break your typing fingers.”

    But rather, acknowledge the person’s persistence by replying, “I have received both of your emails and will respond as soon as I have an answer for you.”

    Passive-aggressive phrase: “Please advise.”

    Don’t give in to the urge to inundate the person with more advice and work than they ever bargained for, such as, “I’m going to need you to cancel your weekend plans and stay here at the office to thoroughly investigate the situation and submit a 100-page report by Monday morning.”

    But rather, take the high road, and offer the advice they are seeking. For example, “Yes, please proceed with your idea,” or, “We have decided to move in a different direction. Please hold off on making any changes.”

    Step 3: Acknowledge the anger.

    If you feel like a co-worker is chronically hostile and using passive-aggressive communication across most situations with you, it might be worth taking the next step, which is to respectfully but very simply acknowledge their anger. For example, you might say, “It sounds like you may be feeling angry,” or, “From your email, I’m wondering if you are frustrated about something.” 

    Nine times out of 10, the passive-aggressive person will reflexively deny that they are feeling angry — and that’s OK. Your respectful acknowledgement marks a change in the dynamic; the passive-aggressive person now knows that you are a straight shooter who will not shy away from trying to resolve a conflict. With consistent use of steps 1 through 3, the passive-aggressive person will have no choice but to begin to relate to you in a more honest way.


    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/passive-aggressive-diaries/201809/how-respond-passive-aggressive-emails-in-the-workplace

  • 17 Aug 2020 10:56 AM | Samantha Vitone (Administrator)

    By Samantha Vitone

    I am a huge morning person. I have a good start in the morning is doing my usual morning routine. One of them is saying ‘good morning’ to my work colleagues. It sets myself towards a great day. When I greet my co-workers in the morning, I notice how it brightens their mood. I know It does for me! Even if you are working remote from home or in the office, it can still play an impact. Not everyone is a morning person but I always say ‘good morning’ because I believe it is important and it can mean much more than you think. Below are a few reasons as to why saying good morning is critical.

    1. Manners: It is like you saying hello to someone but he or she does not say it back – it is just as courtesy. Saying ‘good morning’ is a way to acknowledge one another and it maybe can make someone’s day a little bit better. You are also wishing them well for the day.                                                         
    2. Improves Communication and Positive Among Workers: A 'good morning' acknowledges the presence of your colleagues and makes them feel welcomed. It also gives you a chance to interact with your colleagues for a few minutes or even seconds. According to https://www.thehappinessfirm.com, positive human interactions and communications lead to happier work relations especially when you’re trying to collaborate or to solve problems at work. According to Stanford’s Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education, they say that social connections are not only vital to our physical health, but they’re key to improving our mental and emotional health, too.                                                       
    3. It is Quick - Saying good morning to your co-workers is painless and a fast way to interact with one another. It is a method to acknowledge each other’s presence, especially people we do not usually work one on one with or see too much of.

    Greeting and acknowledging one another is a way to help create positive overall atmosphere in the office. How do you create a happy workplace and boost employee engagement?

  • 21 Jul 2020 9:53 AM | Samantha Vitone (Administrator)

    Getting hired right now, may seem daunting. The last time a pandemic occurred was in 1912 and there weren’t detailed records kept about how the economy bounced right back, let alone a manual written on how to get hired after a pandemic.

    Yet, several companies are hiring right now. Navigating these changing tides means adapting, like being ready for online interviews, longer waiting times and focusing on the things you can control.

    As for the question of, "Can you get hired right now?" the answer is yes. Companies are continuing to hire and rehire as the nation opens back up again. Just take a look at Disney who furloughed employees and now is projected to open on July 11th with employees back on board, safe and healthy. With the national re-opening a decrease in unemployment numbers occurred, down to 13 percent from the 17 percent immediately following the pandemic.

    You may feel ready to work. Guess what, companies feel ready to have you come work. You still have the capacity to do the job and companies adapt to tailor the job responsibility and description to meet these changing times, including ensuring employee safety and health.

    Those are only some of the changes that occurred. The government stepped in during this crisis, helping keep businesses afloat, and still plans to assist during this transition. There is also a predicted rise in a contact-free economy, with a rise in telemedicine, digital commerce and automation. Companies are faced with re-thinking business models entirely, looking to the future with innovation and pliancy to transform their companies in this dynamic world.

    What does this mean for you? Getting hired right now is reality. It may require flexibility, with time and growing new skills. This is a great time to invest in a class, book or training session to develop new skill sets that only set you apart as a candidate. It may mean taking some lifestyle changes, like working from home permanently. Facing the future requires reconstructing what was to create what will be.

    On the practical side of, "How do I get a job right now?" focus on the reality that companies may take a little longer but still practice what helped you land jobs in the past.

    1. Following up: It’s still okay to follow up on your application. Wait about one week before making contact as a general rule of thumb. If you don’t hear back from the company after following up, it’s safe to move onto the next lead.

    2. Interview prep: Prepare like you normally would for an interview (even if the interview is virtual), such as coming up with examples from past experience. Additionally, ask yourself “what skills did I develop during the pandemic that I can take into this next job?” Did you take a class? Did you learn time management skills? Spend time reflecting on this experience and applying it to the workforce.

    3. Keep an eye on the horizon: Keep your eyes out for new opportunities by continuing to search for jobs as well as talking with friends, family and past co-workers about your job hunt. Staying focused on what is out there keeps fueling the fire to move forward.

    Stepping back into work may provide challenges, especially during the changing economy. There are companies hiring out there right now. The process may look different than before, but you can do this.

    This article was written Danielle Beatty.

    Danielle Beatty is a copy writing intern at Nexxt. She brings her experience of exploring for the right job to help job seekers in searching for their next opportunity. She enjoys coffee, music and writing whenever she gets the chance. 

    https://www.theconfidentcareer.com/2020/06/can-you-still-search-for-jobs-and-get-hired-at-the-moment.html

  • 16 Jul 2020 8:51 PM | Mariana Fradman (Administrator)

    Psst… these breakfast ideas taste so good you’ll wonder how they’re even healthy.

    By: Rebecca Jacobs

    Enjoying a healthy breakfast sets the tone for a healthier day. And, not only that but fueling up with nutrient-dense foods is a sure-fire way to give your body that much-needed boost of energy to conquer your daily to-do lists! 

    We’re sharing simple ways to ditch that sugary bowl of sugar and say yes to healthy and wholesome breakfast options to help set you up for serious healthy eating success all day long. 

    READ MORE HERE

  • 08 Jul 2020 8:53 PM | Mariana Fradman (Administrator)

    How to Cope After Being Laid Off

    New York Times writer Holly Epstein Ojalvo speaks with Alison Stewart about managing the emotional impact of losing a job and takes listener calls in How to Manage the Emotional Impact of Getting Laid Off


  • 15 Jun 2020 8:52 PM | Samantha Vitone (Administrator)

    By Samantha Vitone

    Times are tough right now and it is hard to ignore with what is going on in the world, especially in the United States of the year 2020. When I sign in to any social media platform or put the news on, what I usually see is fear. I love being informed and educated with current events but lately, it has played a negative toll on me. I have been feeling sad, upset and concerned. I bet you that I am not the only person who has hit that point during this craziness.

    I recently realized that I needed to make some active changes in my life to help keep my spirits uplifted and to have a sane mind. Below are a few tips and tricks that help me feel relax when I am upset and I want to share them with my readers. This is a time where we should help each other out and I hope my tips will help you too.

    • 1)      Healthy Activities: Step away from your smart phone and yes, you will be okay. “The vast majority of Americans who have access to the internet rely on social media to keep up with friends and current events.” Most of us can agree that social media is a fun and a colossal time-suck and addictive. It has become so easy to access anywhere and anytime and we feel compelled to pay attention 24/7 to what is taking place on our newsfeeds. According to Dr. David Greenfield, he said, ”staying away from social media makes you less prone to such high level of cortisol, leaving you more relaxed and focus. Choose more mentally engaging activity to banish your boredom instead of scrolling through your feeds such as reading a book or building something,” (I love reading books so if you need any book recommendations, let me know!). Once you stop scrolling through other people’s opinions or news, “you will likely find out more about what motivates you, activities you enjoy and it will help lead to the discovery of one’s self.” There are applications that can help keep you off your social media accounts such as Offtime, Moment, Forest and more.
    • 2)       Emotions – It is okay to open up and to seek help. Talk to your family or friends with your issues or even just vent to get some feelings off your chest. If you do not want to talk to anyone who is close to you at first, that is okay. There are several services that can help you such as therapy, find a support group and other helpful services. Or, writing your feelings and thought, can help you understand your feelings more clearly which can improve your mood. “Journaling can help you manage anxiety, reduce stress and cope with depression.”
    • 3)      Staying Active – When I finish a work out, I feel happier and better from either doing a high-intensity work out, a run or the spin bike. Why is that? According to healthdirect.gov.au, regular exercise releases chemicals like endorphins and serotonin which makes you feel good. A recent study done by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that, “running for 15 minutes a day or walking for an hour reduces the risk of major depression by 26%.” In addition to relieving depression symptoms, research also shows that maintaining an exercise schedule can prevent you from relapsing. Even a little bit of activity is better than nothing, take a few minutes out of your day and do a physical activity such as walking in your neighborhood, yoga, stretching and more.
    • 4)      Take A Deep Breath In And Now, Let It Out – What helps me sleep every night is doing deep breathing exercises. The way you breathe affects your whole body and breathing exercises are a great way to reduce tension, relax and relieve stress. Improper breathing can cause anxiety, panic attacks and fatigue. According to psychologist and breathing expert Alison McConnell, “taking 6-10 minutes each day using this breathing technique can help reduce your heart rate and blood pressure.” There are several different breathing exercises that can help you relax. Do your research to find deep breathing techniques that works best for you.

    Difficult times can feel incredibly overwhelming and there are many things we can do to soften the blow. The tips above are ways that can help you be mentally strong during tough times. What helps you de-stress? To help others, let others know what healthy and safe ways that help you relax.

    Samantha is an Associate Member to the Paralegal Association of New Jersey, Inc. She is also the Social Media Coordinator for the New York City Paralegal Association Inc. She enjoys being active and involved in the legal industry, especially the paralegal world.

    Works Cited

    https://www.healthline.com/health/my-65-week-digital-detox

    https://www.thehealthy.com/mental-health/quit-social-media/

    http://www.psyweb.com/articles/mental-health/journaling-to-cope-with-depression-anxiety-and-stress/

    https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/exercise-and-mental-health-recovery

    https://greatist.com/happiness/breathing-exercises-relax

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